Ankle / Foot

Ankle Injuries and Disorders

URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ankleinjuriesanddisorders.html

Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one another, stabilize and support it. Your muscles and tendons move it.

The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is an injury to the ligaments. It may take a few weeks to many months to heal completely. A fracture is a break in a bone. You can also injure other parts of the ankle such as tendons, which join muscles to bone, and cartilage, which cushions your joints. Ankle sprains and fractures are common sports injuries.

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The primary NIH organization for research on Ankle Injuries and Disorders is the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases -http://www.niams.nih.gov/

Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages - http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/ankleinjuriesanddisorders.html

Date last updated: July 05 2009
Topic last reviewed: June 03 2009

From MedlinePlus (http://medlineplus.gov), 24 Hour Health Information.

Foot Injuries and Disorders

URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/footinjuriesanddisorders.html

Each of your feet has 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles and ligaments. No wonder a lot of things can go wrong. Here are a few common problems:

  • Bunions - hard, painful bumps on the big toe joint
  • Hammer toes - toes that curl downward into a claw-like position
  • Calluses and corns - thickened skin from friction or pressure
  • Plantar warts - warts on the soles of your feet
  • Fallen arches - also called flat feet

Ill-fitting shoes often cause these problems. Aging and being overweight also increase your chances of having foot problems.

Start Here Overviews Latest News Diagnosis/Symptoms Treatment Rehabilitation/Recovery Disease Management Specific Conditions Pictures & Photographs Health Check Tools Videos Clinical Trials Genetics Journal Articles
References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
Dictionaries/Glossaries Directories Organizations Law and Policy Statistics Children Seniors You may also be interested in these MedlinePlus related pages:

The primary NIH organization for research on Foot Injuries and Disorders is the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases -http://www.niams.nih.gov/

Date last updated: July 11 2009
Topic last reviewed: April 04 2009

From MedlinePlus (http://medlineplus.gov), 24 Hour Health Information.